Rebuild of Debian using Clang 3.9, 4.0 and 5.0

Août 24th, 2017

tldr: The percentage of failure is decreasing, Clang support is improving but there is a long way to go.

The goal of this initiative is to rebuild Debian using Clang as a compiler instead of gcc. I have been doing this analysis for the last 6 years.

Recently, we rebuilt the archive of the Debian archive with Clang 3.9.1 (July 6th), 4.0.1 (July 6th) and 5.0 rc2 (August 20th).

For various reasons, we didn't perform a rebuild since June 2016 with version 3.8. Therefor, we took the opportunity to do three over the last month.

Now, the 3.9 & 4.0 results are impacted by a build failure when building all haskell packages (the -no-pie option in Clang doesn't exist - I introduced it in clang 5.0). Fixing this issue with 5.0 removed more than 860 failures.

Also, for the same versions, a Qt compiler detection is considering that Clang is not a C++11 compiler because clang++, by default, defines __cplusplus as 199711L (-std=c++11 has to be added to define a correct __cplusplus). See https://bugreports.qt.io/browse/QTBUG-62535 for more information. Some discussions happened on the upstream mailing list about changing the default C++ dialect.
For example, with 4.0, this is causing 132 errors. With 5.0, probably thanks to a new Qt version, roughly the same number of packages are failing but because gcc just triggers a warning with the "nodiscard" attribute being incorrectly used when clang triggers an error.

In parallel, ignoring the haskell build failures, the numbers sightly increased since last year even if the overall percentage decreased (new packages being uploaded in the archive).

VersionBuild failuresIgnoring haskell pkgs
3.81367 / 5.6%
3.92274 / 8.1%1618 / 5.8%
4.02311 / 8.3%1655 / 5.9%
5.01445 / 5.1%

In parallel, new warnings and errors showed up in Clang.
This is causing a new set of build failures (especially with the usage of -Werror).

As few examples:
* Starting with 4.0, clang triggers an error ordered comparison between pointer and zero ('char *' and 'int').
* Similarly, with this version, -Wmain introduces a new warning which will trigger a warning when a bool literal is returned from main.
* clang also introduced a new warning called -Waddress-of-packed-member causing 5 new errors.
* With the same version, clang can trigger a new error when auto is used in function return type.

Now, as a conclusion, having Debian being built with clang by default is still a long shot.
First, when Clang became usable for a general audience, gcc was lagging in term of warning and error detections. Now, gcc is in a much better position than it was, decreasing the interest to have clang replacing gcc. In parallel, most of the efforts in term of warnings
and mistake detections are currently done under the clang tidy umbrella, making them less intrusive as part of this initiative (but harder to use and to deploy).
As an example, the gcc warning -Wmisleading-indentation has been implemented under a clang-tidy checker.
Second, the very permissive license of clang has been a key factor for some operating systems to switch like the PS4, Mac OS X or FreeBSD. With Debian, the community is generally happy with the GPL.
Third, the performances are similar enough that it is not worth the work, except for some projects with very special needs.

Last, despite that it is much easier to contribute to llvm/clang than gcc (not copyright assignment or actual review system for example), this isn't a big differentiator for most of the projects.

Of course, I will continue to run and analysis these rebuilds as this is a great source of information for clang upstream developers to improve the compatibility with gcc and understand some impacts. However, until there is a big game changer, I will stop pursuing the goal of having Debian switching to clang instead of gcc. I will stop effort on the debile project (which was aiming to rebuild in the background packages).

Rebuild of Debian using Clang 3.5.0

September 11th, 2014

Clang 3.5.0 has just been released. A new rebuild has been done highlight the progress to get Debian built with clang.

tl;dr: Great progress. We decreased from 9.5% to 5.7% of failures. Full results are available on http://clang.debian.net

At time of the rebuild with 3.4.2, we had 2040 packages failing to build with clang. With 3.5.0, this dropped to 1261 packages.

Fixes

With Arthur Marble and Alexander Ovchinnikov, both GSoC students, we worked on various ways to decrease the number of errors.

Upstream fixes

First, the most obvious way, we fixed programming bugs/mistakes in upstream sources. Basically, we took categories of failure and fixed issues one after the other. We started with simple bugs like 'Wrong main declaration', 'non-void function should return a value' or 'Void function should not return a value'.

They are trivial to fix. We continued with harder fixes like ' Undefined reference' or 'Variable length array for a non POD (plain old data) element'.

So, besides these one, we worked on:


In total, we reported 295 bugs with patches. 85 of them have been fixed (meaning that the Debian maintainer uploaded a new version with the fix).

In parallel, I think that the switch by FreeBSD and Mac OS X to Clang also helped to fix various issues by upstreams.

Hacking in clang

As a parallel approach, we started to implement a suggestion from Linus Torvalds and a few others. Instead of trying to fix all upstream, where we can, we tried to update clang to improve the gcc compatibility.

gcc has many flags to disable or enable optimizations. Some of them are legacy, others have no sense in clang, etc. Instead of failing in clang with an error, we create a new category of warnings (showing optimization flag '%0' is not supported) and moved all relevant flags into it. Some examples, r212805, r213365, r214906 or r214907

We also updated clang to silent some useless arguments like -finput-charset=UTF-8 (r212110), clang being UTF-8 compliant.

Finally, we worked on the forwarding of linker flags. Clang and gcc have a very different behavior: when gcc does not know an argument, it is going to forward the argument to the linker. Clang, in this case, is going to reject the argument and fail with an error. In clang, we have to explicitly declare which arguments are going to be transfer to the linker. Of course, the correct way to pass arguments to the linker is to use -Xlinker or -Wl but the Debian rebuild proved that these shortcuts are used. Two of these arguments are now forwarded:

  • -z keyword - r213198
  • -u Force symbol to be entered in the output file as an undefined symbol - r211756. This one fixed most of the haskell build failures. It fixed the most common issue that we had (701 occurrences but this does not mean that all these packages build fine now, some haskell-based package are failing later in the process)

New errors

Just like in other releases, new warnings are added in clang. With (bad) usage of -Werror by upstream software, this causes new build failures:

I also took the opportunity to add some further categorizations in the list of errors. Some examples:

Next steps

The Debile project being close to ready with Clément Schreiner's GSoC, we will now have an automatic and transparent way to rebuild packages using clang.

Conclusion

As stated, we can see a huge drop in term of number of failures over time:

Hopefully, Clang getting better and better, more and more projects adopting it as the default compiler or as a base for plugin/extension developments, this percentage will continue to decrease.
Having some kind of release goal with clang for Jessie+1 can now be considered as potentially reachable.

Want to help?

There are several things which can be done to help:

  • Point me common error patterns in the Not categorized list of errors to create new categories
  • Report and fix packages
  • As an upstream, integrate clang as part of your continuous integration system
  • Hack on cqa-scanlogs, the error detection tool to detect error patterns (example: Undetected error). This tool is used also for the regular rebuilds of the archive.
  • Improve clang.debian.net website

Acknowledgments

Thanks to David Suarez for the rebuilds of the archive, Arthur Marble and Alexander Ovchinnikov for their GSoC works and Nicolas Sévelin-Radiguet for the few fixes.

clang 3.4, 3.5 and 3.6 are now coinstallable in Debian

Août 11th, 2014

Clang is finally co installable on Debian. 3.4, 3.5 and the current trunk (snapshot) can be installed together.

So, just like gcc, the different version can be called with clang-3.4, clang-3.5 or clang-3.6.

/usr/bin/clang, /usr/bin/clang++, /usr/bin/scan-build and /usr/bin/scan-view are now handled through the llvm-defaults package.

llvm-defaults is also now managing clang-check, clang-tblgen, c-index-test, clang-apply-replacements, clang-tidy, pp-trace and clang-query.

Changes are also available on llvm.org/apt/.
The next step will be to manage also llvm-defaults on llvm.org/apt to simplify the transition for people using these packages.

So, with:

# /etc/apt/sources.list
deb http://llvm.org/apt/unstable/ llvm-toolchain main
deb http://llvm.org/apt/unstable/ llvm-toolchain-3.4 main
deb http://llvm.org/apt/unstable/ llvm-toolchain-3.5 main
$ apt-get install clang-3.4 clang-3.5 clang-3.6

$ clang-3.4 --version
Debian clang version 3.4.2 (branches/release_34) (based on LLVM 3.4.2)
Target: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix


$ clang-3.5 --version
Debian clang version 3.5.0-+rc2-1~exp1 (tags/RELEASE_350/rc2) (based on LLVM 3.5.0)
Target: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix


$ clang-3.6 --version
Debian clang version 3.6.0-svn214990-1~exp1 (trunk) (based on LLVM 3.6.0)
Target: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix

Debian Twitter accounts are back

August 7th, 2014

After some downtime due to the identi.ca changes, the Debian Twitter accounts are now back.

New Twitter feed ideas are welcome.

Auto-comment on the Release Management flags

Juillet 23rd, 2014

Implemented in bug 853108 by the bmo team, using the tracking flags will automatically updated the comment field with some templates.
The goal is to reduce back and forth in Bugzilla on bug tracking. We also hope that is going to improve our response time.

For example, for the tracking requests (tracking-firefoxNN, tracking-firefox-esrNN or blocking-b2g), the user will see the text added into the Bugzilla comment field:

[Tracking Requested - why for this release]:

With this change, we hope to simplify the decision process for the release team.

For the relnotes-* flags:

Release Note Request (optional, but appreciated)
[Why is this notable]:
[Suggested wording]:
[Links (documentation, blog post, etc)]:

This change aims to simplify the process of release notes writing. In some cases, it can be hard for release manager to translate a bug into a new feature description.

Flags on which this option is enabled are:

  • relnote-firefox
  • relnote-b2g
  • tracking-firefoxNN
  • tracking-firefox-esrNN
  • blocking-b2g

Finally, we reported bug 1041964 to discuss about a potential auto-focus on the comment area.